What Is An Economy Flight?

The descriptive term “economy flight” has more to do with how (un)comfortable the passenger is than with how much they paid for the ticket. FareCompare readers are always on the lookout for the cheapest flight tickets, so it is important to know what an economy flight is, and what an economy flight is not.

What Economy Class Is
When you purchase an “economy flight” ticket, it means you are sitting in the main cabin, not first or business class. Seats are smaller and packed more closely together, and in-flight services are limited. Very few economy flights today have meal service, and in many cases, passengers on economy flights pay for their meals and snacks separately from their ticket.

Economy flight seats on domestic routes usually have seat pitch measurements ranging from 29 to 32 inches. Seat pitch is the distance between a point on one seat and the same point on the seat directly in front of it. Seat pitch is usually slightly greater on international economy flights.

Legroom and Airline Seats: Do We Need New Measurements?

The terms “economy flight” and “economy class” have come to represent unpleasant, crowded conditions to so many people. Perhaps as a result, different airlines around the world have begun using different terminology for their economy flights. Here is a chart of some airlines’ terms for economy flights:

Airline Economy Flight Terminology
Air Canada Hospitality / Hospitalité
Air France Voyageur
Alitalia Classica
British Airways World Traveler
Kingfisher Airlines Kingfisher Class
LAN (Chile) Tourist
Philippine Airlines Fiesta Class

What Economy Class Is Not
It is also important for FareCompare readers to know what an economy flight is not. An economy flight is not:

  • Necessarily non-refundable
  • Always cheap
  • Necessarily the cheapest ticket for a given flight

Getting Comfortable in Economy Class
To make an economy flight more pleasant, you can try to book bulkhead or emergency row seats (assuming you are qualified to sit in the emergency rows). Most people consider aisle seats to be the most “comfortable” economy flight seats, because they do not have to climb over others to access overhead bins or go to the lavatory.

Several airlines, such as Virgin America and JetBlue, offer amenities like seat-back video screens to make economy flights more pleasant. More airlines (including AirTran, Alaska Air, Delta, Frontier, Southwest, United, US Airways and Virgin America) now offer in-flight Wi-Fi on some or all flights for a fee, so that passengers can surf the web to help pass the time. And of course, old stand-bys like MP3 players, earplugs and portable gaming devices are helpful on long economy flights.

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Published: October 17, 2011