Another Airline Adds Child-Free Seats to Planes

If you’re a connoisseur of oddly-named airlines, you’ve probably heard of Scoot. Now the Asia-based discounter is making news because it’s joined a growing trend to provide grown-up travelers with kid-free zones.

Strangest airline names

Scoot Airlines’ Kid-Free Zone

According to the UK’s Telegraph, pay a fee of 9 British pounds (about $14) and you will get upgraded to the ScootinSilence cabin which is actually a 41-seat section at the rear of the cabin where children under the age of 12 are banned. While some might object to sitting in the back of the plane, there is another advantage – these seats have more legroom and four extra inches in the seat pitch.

What is a seat pitch?

Other Airlines Already Ban Children

Asian airlines seem to be ahead of the curve on this trend (a region of overly-delicate sensibilities?), and here are a couple of recent examples:

  • February 2013: AirAsiaX, a low-cost carrier based in Kuala Lumpur launched an economy cabin quiet zone with 8 rows of seats where children are not welcome. The fee is about $12 for this, but as FareCompare pointed out, “There are no guarantees that any in-flight screaming won’t be heard in the quiet zone so bring a pair of noise-canceling headphones just to be on the safe side.”
  • April 2012: Malaysia Airlines has two kid-free zones: All first class sections, plus the entire upper deck of the carrier’s huge A380 planes. Some may recall the utter glee of the airline’s CEO when he first tweeted about the child ban, but others like it too.

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Babies on Planes – Yes or No?

An ongoing verbal battle over the place of children and infants on planes has been playing out on the internet for the past several year, prompting air travel analyst Rick Seaney to ask, “Babies on Planes – Yes or No?” With this latest move from Scoot, it may be time to revisit the topic. Let us know what you think.

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Published: August 22, 2013